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Center Happenings

Lighting party & golf cart parade
Monday, December 1
The public is invited
6 p.m.

OMCA Christmas party
Tuesday, December 16
1 p.m.

40 et 8 Christmas party & open house
Sunday, December 21
12 noon



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About the Hospital

The J. D. McCarty Center was founded in 1946, by a veterans group called the 40 et 8 of Oklahoma. The 40 et 8 was an honor society within the American Legion. When the McCarty Center first opened its doors to patients we only treated one diagnosis – cerebral palsy. Today, we have treated more than 100 different diagnoses in the developmental disability category. Kids come to us for treatment from all over the state of Oklahoma.

Children referred to the hospital are evaluated and treated by a team of pediatricians, pediatric specialists, registered nurses and LPNs, direct care specialists, physical, occupational, speech and language therapists, a dietitian, a clinical psychologist and psychology clinicians and social workers who focus on getting a child to their highest level of functionality and independence.

In October 2004, the McCarty Center moved into a new, custom built, state-of-the-art pediatric rehab hospital facility. Located on an 80-acre campus on the east side of Norman, this facility provides both inpatient and outpatient care. We have a 36 bed inpatient capacity.

In 1946, no one could have known how many children would pass through the McCarty Center doors, but generations of Oklahomans with developmental disabilities owe a debt of gratitude to the founders, legislators, Cerebral Palsy Commissioners, donors, staff and volunteers who have helped in the quest for more functional and independent lives. For almost 70 years after the its’ founding, the J. D. McCarty Center continues to turn stumbling blocks into building blocks for children with developmental disabilities in Oklahoma.